Research-Based Principles of Effective Literacy Instruction for Adolescents
Jigsaw Activity Readings

1. TO GET YOU THINKING:
A. Listen to the Adlit.org webcast for Making Room for Adolescent Literacy (it's about 10 minutes long). An expert panel discusses what research says about good practice and how building-level leaders and classroom teachers can support struggling readers and writers.
B. Read Alvermann, D. E. (2005). Literacy on the edge: How close are we to closing the literacy achievement gap? Voices in the Middle, 13(1), 8-14. This common reading provides interesting insights into
Alvermann 2005 Literacy on the Edge.pdf
Alvermann 2005 Literacy on the Edge.pdf
Alvermann 2005 Literacy on the Edge.pdf


2. Select your assigned reading from the list below. Download the document and skim it carefully to get the gist of the report's main ideas. Be prepared to share the following with your "staff" in small groups back in class:
  • Author, Publisher, & Date
  • Purpose: A one-sentence summary of the report's purpose
  • Rationale: Two data points indicating the need for more effective adolescent literacy instruction
  • Key Principles: 8-15 keywords or SHORT phrases that highlight critical aspects of effective literacy instruction
  • Visual Map: A visual representation of those 8-15 key principles to help others quickly grasp the main ideas of the report

Download this two page file to complete these key ideas for your jigsaw report - please make a copy of your completed visual for each group member (approx. 8 copies - 1 for me)
Research Principles Advanced Organizer.doc
Research Principles Advanced Organizer.doc
Research Principles Advanced Organizer.doc


Please read the article next to the number you were assigned. Be prepared to share your key ideas with your group members about 5 minute segments during the next class

ARTICLE SELECTIONS:
If you were absent, to get credit for your part of the "reporting out," please share at least two things that surprised you and your other reactions or interpretations of recommended practices shared by others in your group.
After class assignments: Ben (4), Austin (5), and Dan ( )

  1. Jenkins, H. (2008). Confronting the challenges of participatory culture: Media education in the 21st Century. John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

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  2. Biancarosa, G. & Snow, C. (2004). Reading Next: A Vision for Action and Research in Middle and High School Literacy, commissioned by the Carnegie Corporation of New York (Alliance for Excellent Education, 2004, Biancarosa & Snow)
ReadingNext.pdf
ReadingNext.pdf
ReadingNext.pdf
  1. Greenleaf, C. & Heller, R. (2007). Literacy Instruction in the Content Areas: Getting to the Core of Middle and High School Improvement. Commissioned by the Carnegie Corporation and published by The Alliance for Excellent Education.

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  2. Short, D. & Fitzsimmons, S. (2007). Double the Work: Challenges and Solutions to Acquiring Language and Academic Literacy for Adolescent English Language Learners. Alliance for Excellent Education and Carnegie Corporation.


  3. Kamil, M., Borman, G., Dole, J., Kral, K., Salinger, T, & Torgeson, J. (2008). Improving Adolescent Literacy. Effective Classroom and Intervention Practices. Institute of Education Sciences (IES).
Kamil et al AdLit IES.pdf
Kamil et al AdLit IES.pdf

Kamil et al AdLit IES.pdf





EXTRA READINGS:
  1. Jenkins, H. (2008). Confronting the challenges of participatory culture: Media education in the 21st Century. John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.
  2. Alvermann, D. (2001). Effective Literacy Instruction for Struggling Adolescent Readers. Published by the National Reading Conference.
  3. Partnership for 21st Century Skills (2006). Results that Matter: 21st Century Skills and High School Reform.
21stCentury.pdf
21stCentury.pdf
21stCentury.pdf



Other Adolescent Literacy Reports of interest:
Langer.pdf
Langer.pdf
Langer.pdf

21stCentury.pdf
21stCentury.pdf
21stCentury.pdf

  • Time to Act: An Agenda for Advancing Adolescent Literacy for College and Career Success (2009): A series of six reports and related podcasts from the Carnegie Corporation of New York that delves into how to advance literacy and learning for all students, including such topics as the cost of implementing adolescent literacy programs and reading in the disciplines.
  • Speak Up: Learning in the 21st Century 2009 Trends Update: This report highlights how students are utilizing technology to become "free agent learners" and driving the demand for more online classes in and out of school. Yet, our schools are limiting online classes to remediation and credit recovery for students, and primarily focusing their online learning initiatives towards professional development for teachers.
  • Improving Adolescent Literacy: Effective Classroom and Intervention Practices (IES Practice Guide) - August, 2008
  • Using Student Engagement to Improve Adolescent Literacy: Implementing the No Child Left Behind Act (2005) by Learning Point.
  • Podcast Interview with Elizabeth Moje that accompanies her 2008 commentary Foregrounding the Disciplines in Secondary Literacy Teaching and Learning: A Call for Change(you can download the article here) published in Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy
  • Project Tomorrow: Preparing Today's Students to be tomorrow's innovators, leaders, and engaged citizens
  • **State Action to Improve Adolescent Literacy** (2009). This report from the National Association of State Boards of Education (NASBE) argues that state education leaders are "painfully aware" of the low literacy levels among large numbers of adolescents, but these leaders have experienced difficulty framing an organized response to the crisis because states and districts generally lack systemic strategies for scaling up literacy instruction as part of subject-matter learning. However, the report, State Actions to Improve Adolescent Literacy: Results from NASBE's State Adolescent Literacy Network, finds that when state leaders have the opportunity to focus their efforts and collaborate with key stakeholder groups, large-scale progress can be made.
  • Five States' Efforts to Improve Adolescent Literacy (2009) highlights common challenges and insights into how Alabama, Florida, Kentucky, New Jersey, and Rhode Island used five strategies to support their adolescent literacy improvement policies. Specifically, it examines how each state 1) engaged key stakeholders to make adolescent literacy a priority; 2) set rigorous state literacy goals and standards, with other state policies aligned to support them; 3) aligned resources to support adolescent literacy goals; 4) built educator capacity to support adolescent literacy programs at state, school, and classroom levels; and 5) measured progress and used data to make decisions and provide oversight.
  • A Critical Mission: Making Adolescent Reading an Immediate Priority in Southern Regional States (2009) urges states to develop comprehensive adolescent literacy policies that can improve reading and writing in secondary schools. The committee had six recommendations to states on how to improve reading among older students served as the basis of the report.(1) Develop statewide policies that establish improvement in reading as the top priority in all public middle grades and high schools; (2) Identify the specific reading skills students need to improve their achievement in key academic subject; (3) Change the curricula to include the reading skills identified as crucial for students in each subject; (4) Help teachers share subject-specific reading strategies with students; (5) Assist struggling readers so that those who are behind can catch up before they become likely high school dropouts; (6) Call for state education agencies to work with local school systems across the region to make sure these changes begin to take place and that every educator knows higher reading skills are the top priority in public education.





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